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POMALYST® (pomalidomide) is a prescription medicine, taken along with the medicine dexamethasone, used to treat people with multiple myeloma who have previously received at least 2 medicines to treat multiple myeloma, including a proteasome inhibitor and lenalidomide, and whose disease has become worse during treatment or within 60 days of finishing the last treatment. It is not known if POMALYST is safe and effective in children.

Patients share their stories
about relapsed multiple myeloma

INSPIRING STORIES

Hear from other patients who continued their
journeys with their POMALYST regimens

Laurie & Nowell
Hear Laurie's story about her experience with multiple myeloma and relapse

Laurie and Nowell talk about their experience with POMALYST.

After you watch the video, learn more about how to take POMALYST.

Laurie: I want to set an example of being a warrior. I want my children to remember me as being strong and being a fighter. That’s really important to me. My name is Laurie and I’m from South Carolina.

Nowell: And I’m Laurie’s husband Nowell.

Laurie: My doctor did explain the possibility of relapse. That’s a very common possibility with multiple myeloma and it’s something that happens.

Nowell: Relapses are tough because there always seems to be progress made and then there would be a relapse and so it was frustrating. But Laurie was always very good about digging into the details and educating herself.

Laurie: You hear the diagnosis of an incurable cancer and people are always really stunned by that. But there is hope.

On Screen Super: Laurie and Nowell were compensated for their time in the creation of this video.

Nowell: It changed everything. The difficulties obviously are significant, but they pale in comparison to what changed in the way we loved each other. You know myeloma sucks but I’m the richest man in the world.

Laurie: Well after I was diagnosed with multiple myeloma, I met with my doctor and we talked about different treatment options and so we worked to find what was suited for me. And that was REVLIMID and dexamethasone so that was the beginning of my treatment. So, I continued with that for a while and then I did a proteasome inhibitor and then after I had relapsed, we tried the POMALYST and dexamethasone. That was his recommendation to move forward for treatment options. So, my experience with POMALYST has been positive. I like that it was an oral capsule.

On Screen Super: Individual results with POMALYST will vary.

Laurie: One of the more significant side effects was fatigue and GI issues. Everybody’s different and everybody responds differently but that was just how that affected my body.

On Screen Super: Individual results with POMALYST will vary. Always consult your doctor about any side effects

Laurie: To remember to stay on treatment, I would set an alarm and that helped me to remember. Sometimes when you’re taking different medications, it’s hard to keep track of everything. So, I would get my POMALYST prescription from my doctor and he would submit that to the specialty pharmacy and then I would do a REMS survey each month.

Laurie: What kept me motivated after my relapse was my family. It was wanting to be there to have time with Nowell and with my grandchildren. That’s so important to me and such a huge part of my life and that really was so important that I wanted to fight, I wanted to stay in the battle. Because it is a battle and I remember my doctor saying that to me when I was diagnosed and that really helped me.

Nowell: I am so proud of you for fighting this fight, for being the love of my life, for teaching me what life is really all about. And that you fight and that you do it with a smile on your face and with a tender heart. It’s just lovely and I love you for it.

Laurie: Well you make fighting for very easy. It’s a gift. It’s a gift.

Important Safety Information 

What is POMALYST® (pomalidomide)?

POMALYST® (pomalidomide) is a prescription medicine, taken along with the medicine dexamethasone, used to treat people with multiple myeloma who have previously received at least 2 medicines to treat multiple myeloma, including a proteasome inhibitor and lenalidomide, and whose disease has become worse during treatment or within 60 days of finishing the last treatment. It is not known if POMALYST is safe and effective in children.

WARNING: Risk to unborn babies, risk of low blood counts and blood clots
What is the most important information I should know about POMALYST?

Before you begin taking POMALYST, you must read and agree to all of the instructions in the POMALYST REMS® program. Before prescribing POMALYST, your healthcare provider (HCP) will explain the POMALYST REMS program to you and have you sign the Patient-Physician Agreement Form.

POMALYST can cause serious side effects, including:

  • Possible birth defects (deformed babies) or death of an unborn baby. Females who are pregnant or plan to become pregnant must not take POMALYST.
    • POMALYST is similar to the medicine thalidomide (THALOMID®), which is known to cause severe life-threatening birth defects. POMALYST has not been tested in pregnant females. POMALYST has harmed unborn animals in animal testing.
    • Females must not get pregnant:
      • For at least 4 weeks before starting POMALYST
      • While taking POMALYST
      • During any breaks (interruptions) in your treatment with POMALYST
      • For at least 4 weeks after stopping POMALYST
    • Females who can become pregnant:
      • Will have pregnancy tests weekly for 4 weeks, then every 4 weeks if your menstrual cycle is regular, or every 2 weeks if your menstrual cycle is irregular. If you miss your period or have unusual bleeding, you will need to have a pregnancy test and receive counseling.
      • Must agree to use 2 acceptable forms of effective birth control at the same time, for at least 4 weeks before, while taking, during any breaks (interruptions) in treatment, and for at least 4 weeks after stopping POMALYST.
      • Talk with your healthcare provider to find out about options for acceptable forms of birth control that you may use to prevent pregnancy during and after treatment with POMALYST.
    • If you become pregnant while taking POMALYST, stop taking it right away and call your healthcare provider. If your healthcare provider is not available, you can call Celgene Customer Care Center at 1-888-423-5436. Healthcare providers and patients should report all cases of pregnancy to:

      • FDA MedWatch at 1-800-FDA-1088
      • Celgene Corporation at 1-888-423-5436

      There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors the outcomes of females who take POMALYST during pregnancy, or if their male partner takes POMALYST and they are exposed during pregnancy. You can enroll in this registry by calling Celgene Corporation at the phone number listed above.

    • POMALYST can pass into human semen:

      • Males, including those who have had a vasectomy, must always use a latex or synthetic condom during any sexual contact with a pregnant female or a female that can become pregnant while taking POMALYST, during any breaks (interruptions) in your treatment with POMALYST, and for 4 weeks after stopping POMALYST.
      • Do not have unprotected sexual contact with a female who is or could become pregnant. Tell your healthcare provider if you do have unprotected sexual contact with a female who is or could become pregnant.
      • Do not donate sperm while taking POMALYST, during any breaks (interruptions) in your treatment, and for 4 weeks after stopping POMALYST. If a female becomes pregnant with your sperm, the baby may be exposed to POMALYST and may be born with birth defects.

      Men, if your female partner becomes pregnant, you should call your healthcare provider right away.

    • Do not donate blood while you take POMALYST, during any breaks (interruptions) in your treatment, and for 4 weeks after stopping POMALYST. If someone who is pregnant gets your donated blood, her baby may be exposed to POMALYST and may be born with birth defects.

  • Blood clots in your arteries, veins, and lungs, heart attack, and stroke can happen if you take POMALYST.

    • Most people who take POMALYST will also take a blood thinner medicine to help prevent blood clots.
    • Before taking POMALYST, tell your healthcare provider:
      • If you have had a blood clot in the past.
      • If you have high blood pressure, smoke, or if you have been told you have a high level of fat in your blood (hyperlipidemia).
      • About all the medicines you take. Certain other medicines can also increase your risk for blood clots.

Call your healthcare provider or get medical help right away if you get any of the following during treatment with POMALYST:

    • Signs or symptoms of a blood clot in the lung, arm, or leg may include: shortness of breath, chest pain, or arm or leg swelling.

    • Signs or symptoms of a heart attack may include: chest pain that may spread to the arms, neck, jaw, back, or stomach area (abdomen); feeling sweaty, shortness of breath, feeling sick, or vomiting.

    • Signs or symptoms of stroke may include: sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body, severe headache or confusion, or problems with vision, speech, or balance.

    • A red, itchy skin rash
    • Peeling of your skin or blisters
    • Severe itching
    • Fever

 

Get emergency medical help right away if you develop any of the following signs or symptoms during treatment with POMALYST:

  • swelling of your lips, mouth, tongue, or throat
  • trouble breathing or swallowing
  • raised red areas on your skin (hives)
  • a very fast heartbeat
  • You feel dizzy or faint
Who should not take POMALYST?

Do not take POMALYST if you:

  • Are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or become pregnant during treatment with POMALYST. See “What is the most important information I should know about POMALYST?”
  • Are allergic to pomalidomide or any of the ingredients in POMALYST.
What should I tell my healthcare provider (HCP) before taking POMALYST?
  • If you smoke cigarettes (POMALYST may not work as well in people who smoke), have any other medical conditions, or are breastfeeding. Do not breastfeed during treatment with POMALYST—it is not known if POMALYST passes into breast milk and can harm the baby.
  • If you have liver problems
  • If you have kidney problems and are receiving hemodialysis treatment
  • Tell your HCP about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. POMALYST and other medicines may affect each other, causing serious side effects. Talk with your HCP before taking any new medicines.
How should I take POMALYST?

Take POMALYST exactly as prescribed and follow all the instructions of the POMALYST REMS program.

  • Swallow POMALYST capsules whole with water 1 time a day. Do not break, chew, or open capsules.
  • Take POMALYST at the same time each day with or without food.
  • If you are on hemodialysis, take POMALYST after hemodialysis on hemodialysis days.
  • Do not open POMALYST capsules or handle them any more than needed. If you touch a broken POMALYST capsule or the medicine in the capsule, wash the area of your body right away with soap and water.
  • If you miss a dose of POMALYST and it has been less than 12 hours since your regular time, take POMALYST as soon as you remember. If it has been more than 12 hours, just skip your missed dose. Do not take 2 doses at the same time.
  • If you take too much POMALYST, call your healthcare provider (HCP) right away.
  • Do not share POMALYST with other people. It may cause birth defects and other serious problems.
What are the possible side effects of POMALYST?
  • See “What is the most important information I should know about POMALYST?”
  • POMALYST can cause serious side effects, including:
    • Low white blood cells (neutropenia), low platelets (thrombocytopenia), and low red blood cells (anemia) are common with POMALYST, but can also be serious. You may need a blood transfusion or certain medicines if your blood counts drop too low. Your blood counts should be checked by your healthcare provider (HCP) weekly for the first 8 weeks of treatment and monthly after that.
    • Severe liver problems, including liver failure and death. Your HCP should do blood tests to check your liver function during your treatment with POMALYST. Tell your HCP right away if you develop any of the following symptoms: yellowing of your skin or the white parts of your eyes (jaundice); dark or brown (tea-colored) urine; pain on the upper right side of your stomach area (abdomen); bleeding or bruising more easily than normal, or feeling very tired.
    • Severe allergic and severe skin reactions can happen with POMALYST and may cause death.
    • Dizziness and confusion. Avoid taking other medicines that may cause dizziness and confusion during treatment with POMALYST. Avoid situations that require you to be alert until you know how POMALYST affects you.
    • Nerve damage. Stop taking POMALYST and call your HCP if you develop numbness, tingling, pain, or a burning sensation in your hands, legs, or feet.
    • New cancers (malignancies). New cancers, including certain blood cancers (acute myelogenous leukemia or AML) have been seen in people who received POMALYST. Talk with your HCP about your risk.
    • Tumor Lysis Syndrome (TLS). TLS is caused by the fast breakdown of cancer cells. TLS can cause kidney failure and the need for dialysis treatment, abnormal heart rhythm, seizure, and sometimes death. Your HCP may do blood tests to check you for TLS.
  • The most common side effects of POMALYST include tiredness, weakness, constipation, nausea, diarrhea, shortness of breath, upper respiratory tract infection, back pain, and fever.
  • These are not all the possible side effects of POMALYST. Your HCP may tell you to stop taking POMALYST if you develop certain serious side effects during treatment. Call your HCP for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Boxed WARNINGS and Medication Guide.

POMALYST®, and POMALYST REMS® are registered trademarks of Celgene Corporation.
© 2020 Celgene Corporation 1/20 [US-POM-19-0225]

PHILLIP
Hear Philip's story about his experience with multiple myeloma and how POMALYST ® (pomalidomide) with dexamethasone worked for him

How POMALYST with dexamethasone worked for Phillip.

After you watch the video, learn more about how to take POMALYST.

VOICEOVER: POMALYST® (pomalidomide) is a prescription medicine, taken along with the medicine dexamethasone, used to treat people with multiple myeloma who have previously received at least two medicines to treat multiple myeloma, including a proteasome inhibitor and lenalidomide, and whose disease has become worse during treatment or within sixty days of finishing the last treatment. It is not known if POMALYST is safe and effective in children. Please see full Prescribing Information, including Boxed WARNINGS and Medication Guide. POMALYST may cause serious side effects, including possible birth defects or death of an unborn baby, low white blood cells and low platelets, and blood clots. Talk to your doctor about POMALYST and the POMALYST REMS® program. Phillip is an actual POMALYST patient. He has been paid to share his experience. Individual experiences with POMALYST may vary. Talk to your doctor to see if POMALYST may be right for you.

PHILLIP: I’ve been married to my wife, Carmen, for thirty-six years. We have four children, seven grandchildren and one great-grandchild. I was a firefighter for thirty-two years, but since my retirement, we’ve been traveling, we’re relaxing more, and we just have fun and enjoy each other’s company. It’s a great life. After being diagnosed with multiple myeloma, I was placed into a clinical trial which included REVLIMID and a proteasome inhibitor. After a while, my readings indicated that my myeloma was no longer responding to the therapy. So then I was taken out of the trial and it was pretty scary for my wife and I at the time. But the doctor and the nurse were very reassuring and, uh, he just said to us, “Don’t worry. There are more drugs we can use. My doctor presented multiple treatments. One of our options was POMALYST with dexamethasone. He said POMALYST works similar to REVLIMID, but that it also continues to fight the cells that have become resistant to REVLIMID. He also said that POMALYST would be taken orally and that was pretty important to me. My doctor did inform me about the possibility of serious side effects, including the risk of new cancers, severe liver problems and serious allergic reactions as well as more common ones like tiredness, diarrhea and fever. But this type of treatment had worked for me in the past, so that helped us to decide to go with POMALYST and dexamethasone as our next course of treatment. My support team has been my church, my family and my medical team, especially my nurse practitioner. She’s more than a nurse to us, everything is straight and honest. It’s like talking to one of my friends. Taking POMALYST with dexamethasone, I’ve been able to have a pretty normal routine. I get up every morning at six a.m. and I take my POMALYST on the days that it’s scheduled and I feed the cat. During the day, I’m able to pick up my granddaughter from school and do her homework with her. I’m able to hold a breakfast once a month with my retired firefighter friends. Or just do whatever I feel like doing for the day. I have experienced some side effects with POMALYST. Dry patches on my scalp and a pulmonary embolism. But the way I look at it, I will stay on POMALYST for as long as it’s working for me. Taking a capsule at home and just move on with my day, that’s my speed, and because of POMALYST and dexamethasone, I can keep up the fight.

Important Safety Information 

What is POMALYST® (pomalidomide)?

POMALYST® (pomalidomide) is a prescription medicine, taken along with the medicine dexamethasone, used to treat people with multiple myeloma who have previously received at least 2 medicines to treat multiple myeloma, including a proteasome inhibitor and lenalidomide, and whose disease has become worse during treatment or within 60 days of finishing the last treatment. It is not known if POMALYST is safe and effective in children.

WARNING: Risk to unborn babies, risk of low blood counts and blood clots
What is the most important information I should know about POMALYST?

Before you begin taking POMALYST, you must read and agree to all of the instructions in the POMALYST REMS® program. Before prescribing POMALYST, your healthcare provider (HCP) will explain the POMALYST REMS program to you and have you sign the Patient-Physician Agreement Form.

POMALYST can cause serious side effects, including:

  • Possible birth defects (deformed babies) or death of an unborn baby. Females who are pregnant or plan to become pregnant must not take POMALYST.
    • POMALYST is similar to the medicine thalidomide (THALOMID®), which is known to cause severe life-threatening birth defects. POMALYST has not been tested in pregnant females. POMALYST has harmed unborn animals in animal testing.
    • Females must not get pregnant:
      • For at least 4 weeks before starting POMALYST
      • While taking POMALYST
      • During any breaks (interruptions) in your treatment with POMALYST
      • For at least 4 weeks after stopping POMALYST
    • Females who can become pregnant:
      • Will have pregnancy tests weekly for 4 weeks, then every 4 weeks if your menstrual cycle is regular, or every 2 weeks if your menstrual cycle is irregular. If you miss your period or have unusual bleeding, you will need to have a pregnancy test and receive counseling.
      • Must agree to use 2 acceptable forms of effective birth control at the same time, for at least 4 weeks before, while taking, during any breaks (interruptions) in treatment, and for at least 4 weeks after stopping POMALYST.
      • Talk with your healthcare provider to find out about options for acceptable forms of birth control that you may use to prevent pregnancy during and after treatment with POMALYST.
    • If you become pregnant while taking POMALYST, stop taking it right away and call your healthcare provider. If your healthcare provider is not available, you can call Celgene Customer Care Center at 1-888-423-5436. Healthcare providers and patients should report all cases of pregnancy to:

      • FDA MedWatch at 1-800-FDA-1088
      • Celgene Corporation at 1-888-423-5436

      There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors the outcomes of females who take POMALYST during pregnancy, or if their male partner takes POMALYST and they are exposed during pregnancy. You can enroll in this registry by calling Celgene Corporation at the phone number listed above.

    • POMALYST can pass into human semen:

      • Males, including those who have had a vasectomy, must always use a latex or synthetic condom during any sexual contact with a pregnant female or a female that can become pregnant while taking POMALYST, during any breaks (interruptions) in your treatment with POMALYST, and for 4 weeks after stopping POMALYST.
      • Do not have unprotected sexual contact with a female who is or could become pregnant. Tell your healthcare provider if you do have unprotected sexual contact with a female who is or could become pregnant.
      • Do not donate sperm while taking POMALYST, during any breaks (interruptions) in your treatment, and for 4 weeks after stopping POMALYST. If a female becomes pregnant with your sperm, the baby may be exposed to POMALYST and may be born with birth defects.

      Men, if your female partner becomes pregnant, you should call your healthcare provider right away.

    • Do not donate blood while you take POMALYST, during any breaks (interruptions) in your treatment, and for 4 weeks after stopping POMALYST. If someone who is pregnant gets your donated blood, her baby may be exposed to POMALYST and may be born with birth defects.

  • Blood clots in your arteries, veins, and lungs, heart attack, and stroke can happen if you take POMALYST.

    • Most people who take POMALYST will also take a blood thinner medicine to help prevent blood clots.
    • Before taking POMALYST, tell your healthcare provider:
      • If you have had a blood clot in the past.
      • If you have high blood pressure, smoke, or if you have been told you have a high level of fat in your blood (hyperlipidemia).
      • About all the medicines you take. Certain other medicines can also increase your risk for blood clots.

Call your healthcare provider or get medical help right away if you get any of the following during treatment with POMALYST:

    • Signs or symptoms of a blood clot in the lung, arm, or leg may include: shortness of breath, chest pain, or arm or leg swelling.

    • Signs or symptoms of a heart attack may include: chest pain that may spread to the arms, neck, jaw, back, or stomach area (abdomen); feeling sweaty, shortness of breath, feeling sick, or vomiting.

    • Signs or symptoms of stroke may include: sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body, severe headache or confusion, or problems with vision, speech, or balance.

    • A red, itchy skin rash
    • Peeling of your skin or blisters
    • Severe itching
    • Fever

 

Get emergency medical help right away if you develop any of the following signs or symptoms during treatment with POMALYST:

  • swelling of your lips, mouth, tongue, or throat
  • trouble breathing or swallowing
  • raised red areas on your skin (hives)
  • a very fast heartbeat
  • You feel dizzy or faint
Who should not take POMALYST?

Do not take POMALYST if you:

  • Are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or become pregnant during treatment with POMALYST. See “What is the most important information I should know about POMALYST?”
  • Are allergic to pomalidomide or any of the ingredients in POMALYST.
What should I tell my healthcare provider (HCP) before taking POMALYST?
  • If you smoke cigarettes (POMALYST may not work as well in people who smoke), have any other medical conditions, or are breastfeeding. Do not breastfeed during treatment with POMALYST—it is not known if POMALYST passes into breast milk and can harm the baby.
  • If you have liver problems
  • If you have kidney problems and are receiving hemodialysis treatment
  • Tell your HCP about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. POMALYST and other medicines may affect each other, causing serious side effects. Talk with your HCP before taking any new medicines.
How should I take POMALYST?

Take POMALYST exactly as prescribed and follow all the instructions of the POMALYST REMS program.

  • Swallow POMALYST capsules whole with water 1 time a day. Do not break, chew, or open capsules.
  • Take POMALYST at the same time each day with or without food.
  • If you are on hemodialysis, take POMALYST after hemodialysis on hemodialysis days.
  • Do not open POMALYST capsules or handle them any more than needed. If you touch a broken POMALYST capsule or the medicine in the capsule, wash the area of your body right away with soap and water.
  • If you miss a dose of POMALYST and it has been less than 12 hours since your regular time, take POMALYST as soon as you remember. If it has been more than 12 hours, just skip your missed dose. Do not take 2 doses at the same time.
  • If you take too much POMALYST, call your healthcare provider (HCP) right away.
  • Do not share POMALYST with other people. It may cause birth defects and other serious problems.
What are the possible side effects of POMALYST?
  • See “What is the most important information I should know about POMALYST?”
  • POMALYST can cause serious side effects, including:
    • Low white blood cells (neutropenia), low platelets (thrombocytopenia), and low red blood cells (anemia) are common with POMALYST, but can also be serious. You may need a blood transfusion or certain medicines if your blood counts drop too low. Your blood counts should be checked by your healthcare provider (HCP) weekly for the first 8 weeks of treatment and monthly after that.
    • Severe liver problems, including liver failure and death. Your HCP should do blood tests to check your liver function during your treatment with POMALYST. Tell your HCP right away if you develop any of the following symptoms: yellowing of your skin or the white parts of your eyes (jaundice); dark or brown (tea-colored) urine; pain on the upper right side of your stomach area (abdomen); bleeding or bruising more easily than normal, or feeling very tired.
    • Severe allergic and severe skin reactions can happen with POMALYST and may cause death.
    • Dizziness and confusion. Avoid taking other medicines that may cause dizziness and confusion during treatment with POMALYST. Avoid situations that require you to be alert until you know how POMALYST affects you.
    • Nerve damage. Stop taking POMALYST and call your HCP if you develop numbness, tingling, pain, or a burning sensation in your hands, legs, or feet.
    • New cancers (malignancies). New cancers, including certain blood cancers (acute myelogenous leukemia or AML) have been seen in people who received POMALYST. Talk with your HCP about your risk.
    • Tumor Lysis Syndrome (TLS). TLS is caused by the fast breakdown of cancer cells. TLS can cause kidney failure and the need for dialysis treatment, abnormal heart rhythm, seizure, and sometimes death. Your HCP may do blood tests to check you for TLS.
  • The most common side effects of POMALYST include tiredness, weakness, constipation, nausea, diarrhea, shortness of breath, upper respiratory tract infection, back pain, and fever.
  • These are not all the possible side effects of POMALYST. Your HCP may tell you to stop taking POMALYST if you develop certain serious side effects during treatment. Call your HCP for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Boxed WARNINGS and Medication Guide.

POMALYST®, and POMALYST REMS® are registered trademarks of Celgene Corporation.
© 2020 Celgene Corporation 1/20 [US-POM-19-0361]

Marc & Michele
Hear Marc’s story about relapsed multiple myeloma and how POMALYST® (pomalidomide) and a sense of humor played a role

Marc and Michele share how both POMALYST and a sense of humor played a role after Marc’s relapse.

After you watch the video, learn more about relapse.

Marc: It was surreal when I was told that I had multiple myeloma. It just shocked me. I was fit, healthy, active and that diagnosis changed my whole career from law enforcement and firefighting into fighting the multiple myeloma.

Marc: My name is Marc; I’m married to Michele. When I was told I was relapsing my mind initially started going, “Oh my God, you know what options do I have?” It was unexpected.

On Screen Super: Marc and Michelle were compensated for their time in the creation of this video.

Michele: I’m an emotional person as you can tell. It was scary, it was very scary.

Marc: My treatment plan included REVLIMID with dex. A proteasome inhibitor. After I relapsed my doctor put me on POMALYST with dexamethasone. He felt that was the way for us to fight the multiple myeloma.

On Screen Super: The REVLIMID and dexamethasone regimen was followed by a separate regimen including a proteasome inhibitor in Marc’s treatment.

Marc: I like POMALYST for the fact that it’s an oral medication and it fits well within my lifestyle. I typically take it after my meal so I’m taking it at the same time, I just take it when I’m done eating dinner.

On Screen Super: Individual results with POMALYST will vary.

Marc: When I started taking POMALYST, I had a side effect of rash. I spoke to my doctor about it. He is absolutely phenomenal. He’s there for me, even if I don’t have an appointment. I can call him up and say, “hey here’s the problem I have” and his nurse is on it.

On Screen Super: Individual results with POMALYST will vary. Call your HCP if you have any symptoms of an allergic reaction, including: swelling of your lips, mouth, tongue, or throat; trouble breathing; or skin reaction.

Marc: So, what keeps me motivated through all of this and staying on treatment is my family. My wife and my daughter. Michele took on the role of caregiver unwilling; it was thrust upon her. But she has been amazing with it. Always wanting to be there when I’m going through treatment and always being there.

Michele: Don’t do it alone. Let people help you, they want to help you, your neighbors want to help you.

Marc: I’ve always liked to laugh. Even growing up trying to take bad things and interject some humor and I never really realized the importance until I became sick.

Michele: I believe what you put out is what you get back. So, I try to be positive.

Marc: You do a good job.

Michele: I do. The advice I would give to someone just starting to be a caregiver is to take care of yourself also. Don’t get so wrapped up in taking care of someone else that you forget about yourself.

Marc: Instead of worrying about the big overall picture, little piece at a time. You have to be tougher than the disease and I’m not going to let the disease win. I have a wife and a daughter. I have a life and I’m not going to let a disease take over me and make me somebody I’m not.

Important Safety Information 

What is POMALYST® (pomalidomide)?

POMALYST® (pomalidomide) is a prescription medicine, taken along with the medicine dexamethasone, used to treat people with multiple myeloma who have previously received at least 2 medicines to treat multiple myeloma, including a proteasome inhibitor and lenalidomide, and whose disease has become worse during treatment or within 60 days of finishing the last treatment. It is not known if POMALYST is safe and effective in children.

WARNING: Risk to unborn babies, risk of low blood counts and blood clots
What is the most important information I should know about POMALYST?

Before you begin taking POMALYST, you must read and agree to all of the instructions in the POMALYST REMS® program. Before prescribing POMALYST, your healthcare provider (HCP) will explain the POMALYST REMS program to you and have you sign the Patient-Physician Agreement Form.

POMALYST can cause serious side effects, including:

  • Possible birth defects (deformed babies) or death of an unborn baby. Females who are pregnant or plan to become pregnant must not take POMALYST.
    • POMALYST is similar to the medicine thalidomide (THALOMID®), which is known to cause severe life-threatening birth defects. POMALYST has not been tested in pregnant females. POMALYST has harmed unborn animals in animal testing.
    • Females must not get pregnant:
      • For at least 4 weeks before starting POMALYST
      • While taking POMALYST
      • During any breaks (interruptions) in your treatment with POMALYST
      • For at least 4 weeks after stopping POMALYST
    • Females who can become pregnant:
      • Will have pregnancy tests weekly for 4 weeks, then every 4 weeks if your menstrual cycle is regular, or every 2 weeks if your menstrual cycle is irregular. If you miss your period or have unusual bleeding, you will need to have a pregnancy test and receive counseling.
      • Must agree to use 2 acceptable forms of effective birth control at the same time, for at least 4 weeks before, while taking, during any breaks (interruptions) in treatment, and for at least 4 weeks after stopping POMALYST.
      • Talk with your healthcare provider to find out about options for acceptable forms of birth control that you may use to prevent pregnancy during and after treatment with POMALYST.
    • If you become pregnant while taking POMALYST, stop taking it right away and call your healthcare provider. If your healthcare provider is not available, you can call Celgene Customer Care Center at 1-888-423-5436. Healthcare providers and patients should report all cases of pregnancy to:

      • FDA MedWatch at 1-800-FDA-1088
      • Celgene Corporation at 1-888-423-5436

      There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors the outcomes of females who take POMALYST during pregnancy, or if their male partner takes POMALYST and they are exposed during pregnancy. You can enroll in this registry by calling Celgene Corporation at the phone number listed above.

    • POMALYST can pass into human semen:

      • Males, including those who have had a vasectomy, must always use a latex or synthetic condom during any sexual contact with a pregnant female or a female that can become pregnant while taking POMALYST, during any breaks (interruptions) in your treatment with POMALYST, and for 4 weeks after stopping POMALYST.
      • Do not have unprotected sexual contact with a female who is or could become pregnant. Tell your healthcare provider if you do have unprotected sexual contact with a female who is or could become pregnant.
      • Do not donate sperm while taking POMALYST, during any breaks (interruptions) in your treatment, and for 4 weeks after stopping POMALYST. If a female becomes pregnant with your sperm, the baby may be exposed to POMALYST and may be born with birth defects.

      Men, if your female partner becomes pregnant, you should call your healthcare provider right away.

    • Do not donate blood while you take POMALYST, during any breaks (interruptions) in your treatment, and for 4 weeks after stopping POMALYST. If someone who is pregnant gets your donated blood, her baby may be exposed to POMALYST and may be born with birth defects.

  • Blood clots in your arteries, veins, and lungs, heart attack, and stroke can happen if you take POMALYST.

    • Most people who take POMALYST will also take a blood thinner medicine to help prevent blood clots.
    • Before taking POMALYST, tell your healthcare provider:
      • If you have had a blood clot in the past.
      • If you have high blood pressure, smoke, or if you have been told you have a high level of fat in your blood (hyperlipidemia).
      • About all the medicines you take. Certain other medicines can also increase your risk for blood clots.

Call your healthcare provider or get medical help right away if you get any of the following during treatment with POMALYST:

    • Signs or symptoms of a blood clot in the lung, arm, or leg may include: shortness of breath, chest pain, or arm or leg swelling.

    • Signs or symptoms of a heart attack may include: chest pain that may spread to the arms, neck, jaw, back, or stomach area (abdomen); feeling sweaty, shortness of breath, feeling sick, or vomiting.

    • Signs or symptoms of stroke may include: sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body, severe headache or confusion, or problems with vision, speech, or balance.

    • A red, itchy skin rash
    • Peeling of your skin or blisters
    • Severe itching
    • Fever

 

Get emergency medical help right away if you develop any of the following signs or symptoms during treatment with POMALYST:

  • swelling of your lips, mouth, tongue, or throat
  • trouble breathing or swallowing
  • raised red areas on your skin (hives)
  • a very fast heartbeat
  • You feel dizzy or faint
Who should not take POMALYST?

Do not take POMALYST if you:

  • Are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or become pregnant during treatment with POMALYST. See “What is the most important information I should know about POMALYST?”
  • Are allergic to pomalidomide or any of the ingredients in POMALYST.
What should I tell my healthcare provider (HCP) before taking POMALYST?
  • If you smoke cigarettes (POMALYST may not work as well in people who smoke), have any other medical conditions, or are breastfeeding. Do not breastfeed during treatment with POMALYST—it is not known if POMALYST passes into breast milk and can harm the baby.
  • If you have liver problems
  • If you have kidney problems and are receiving hemodialysis treatment
  • Tell your HCP about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. POMALYST and other medicines may affect each other, causing serious side effects. Talk with your HCP before taking any new medicines.
How should I take POMALYST?

Take POMALYST exactly as prescribed and follow all the instructions of the POMALYST REMS program.

  • Swallow POMALYST capsules whole with water 1 time a day. Do not break, chew, or open capsules.
  • Take POMALYST at the same time each day with or without food.
  • If you are on hemodialysis, take POMALYST after hemodialysis on hemodialysis days.
  • Do not open POMALYST capsules or handle them any more than needed. If you touch a broken POMALYST capsule or the medicine in the capsule, wash the area of your body right away with soap and water.
  • If you miss a dose of POMALYST and it has been less than 12 hours since your regular time, take POMALYST as soon as you remember. If it has been more than 12 hours, just skip your missed dose. Do not take 2 doses at the same time.
  • If you take too much POMALYST, call your healthcare provider (HCP) right away.
  • Do not share POMALYST with other people. It may cause birth defects and other serious problems.
What are the possible side effects of POMALYST?
  • See “What is the most important information I should know about POMALYST?”
  • POMALYST can cause serious side effects, including:
    • Low white blood cells (neutropenia), low platelets (thrombocytopenia), and low red blood cells (anemia) are common with POMALYST, but can also be serious. You may need a blood transfusion or certain medicines if your blood counts drop too low. Your blood counts should be checked by your healthcare provider (HCP) weekly for the first 8 weeks of treatment and monthly after that.
    • Severe liver problems, including liver failure and death. Your HCP should do blood tests to check your liver function during your treatment with POMALYST. Tell your HCP right away if you develop any of the following symptoms: yellowing of your skin or the white parts of your eyes (jaundice); dark or brown (tea-colored) urine; pain on the upper right side of your stomach area (abdomen); bleeding or bruising more easily than normal, or feeling very tired.
    • Severe allergic and severe skin reactions can happen with POMALYST and may cause death.
    • Dizziness and confusion. Avoid taking other medicines that may cause dizziness and confusion during treatment with POMALYST. Avoid situations that require you to be alert until you know how POMALYST affects you.
    • Nerve damage. Stop taking POMALYST and call your HCP if you develop numbness, tingling, pain, or a burning sensation in your hands, legs, or feet.
    • New cancers (malignancies). New cancers, including certain blood cancers (acute myelogenous leukemia or AML) have been seen in people who received POMALYST. Talk with your HCP about your risk.
    • Tumor Lysis Syndrome (TLS). TLS is caused by the fast breakdown of cancer cells. TLS can cause kidney failure and the need for dialysis treatment, abnormal heart rhythm, seizure, and sometimes death. Your HCP may do blood tests to check you for TLS.
  • The most common side effects of POMALYST include tiredness, weakness, constipation, nausea, diarrhea, shortness of breath, upper respiratory tract infection, back pain, and fever.
  • These are not all the possible side effects of POMALYST. Your HCP may tell you to stop taking POMALYST if you develop certain serious side effects during treatment. Call your HCP for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Boxed WARNINGS and Medication Guide.

POMALYST®, and POMALYST REMS® are registered trademarks of Celgene Corporation.
© 2020 Celgene Corporation 1/20 [US-POM-19-0224]

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What is POMALYST® (pomalidomide)?

POMALYST® (pomalidomide) is a prescription medicine, taken along with the medicine dexamethasone, used to treat people with multiple myeloma who have previously received at least 2 medicines to treat multiple myeloma, including a proteasome inhibitor and lenalidomide, and whose disease has become worse during treatment or within 60 days of finishing the last treatment. It is not known if POMALYST is safe and effective in children.

WARNING: Risk to unborn babies, risk of low blood counts and blood clots
What is the most important information I should know about POMALYST?

Before you begin taking POMALYST, you must read and agree to all of the instructions in the POMALYST REMS® program. Before prescribing POMALYST, your healthcare provider (HCP) will explain the POMALYST REMS program to you and have you sign the Patient-Physician Agreement Form.

POMALYST can cause serious side effects, including:

  • Possible birth defects (deformed babies) or death of an unborn baby. Females who are pregnant or plan to become pregnant must not take POMALYST.
    • POMALYST is similar to the medicine thalidomide (THALOMID®), which is known to cause severe life-threatening birth defects. POMALYST has not been tested in pregnant females. POMALYST has harmed unborn animals in animal testing.
    • Females must not get pregnant:
      • For at least 4 weeks before starting POMALYST
      • While taking POMALYST
      • During any breaks (interruptions) in your treatment with POMALYST
      • For at least 4 weeks after stopping POMALYST
    • Females who can become pregnant:
      • Will have pregnancy tests weekly for 4 weeks, then every 4 weeks if your menstrual cycle is regular, or every 2 weeks if your menstrual cycle is irregular. If you miss your period or have unusual bleeding, you will need to have a pregnancy test and receive counseling.
      • Must agree to use 2 acceptable forms of effective birth control at the same time, for at least 4 weeks before, while taking, during any breaks (interruptions) in treatment, and for at least 4 weeks after stopping POMALYST.
      • Talk with your healthcare provider to find out about options for acceptable forms of birth control that you may use to prevent pregnancy during and after treatment with POMALYST.
    • If you become pregnant while taking POMALYST, stop taking it right away and call your healthcare provider. If your healthcare provider is not available, you can call Celgene Customer Care Center at 1-888-423-5436. Healthcare providers and patients should report all cases of pregnancy to:

      • FDA MedWatch at 1-800-FDA-1088
      • Celgene Corporation at 1-888-423-5436

      There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors the outcomes of females who take POMALYST during pregnancy, or if their male partner takes POMALYST and they are exposed during pregnancy. You can enroll in this registry by calling Celgene Corporation at the phone number listed above.

    • POMALYST can pass into human semen:

      • Males, including those who have had a vasectomy, must always use a latex or synthetic condom during any sexual contact with a pregnant female or a female that can become pregnant while taking POMALYST, during any breaks (interruptions) in your treatment with POMALYST, and for 4 weeks after stopping POMALYST.
      • Do not have unprotected sexual contact with a female who is or could become pregnant. Tell your healthcare provider if you do have unprotected sexual contact with a female who is or could become pregnant.
      • Do not donate sperm while taking POMALYST, during any breaks (interruptions) in your treatment, and for 4 weeks after stopping POMALYST. If a female becomes pregnant with your sperm, the baby may be exposed to POMALYST and may be born with birth defects.

      Men, if your female partner becomes pregnant, you should call your healthcare provider right away.

    • Do not donate blood while you take POMALYST, during any breaks (interruptions) in your treatment, and for 4 weeks after stopping POMALYST. If someone who is pregnant gets your donated blood, her baby may be exposed to POMALYST and may be born with birth defects.

  • Blood clots in your arteries, veins, and lungs, heart attack, and stroke can happen if you take POMALYST.

    • Most people who take POMALYST will also take a blood thinner medicine to help prevent blood clots.
    • Before taking POMALYST, tell your healthcare provider:
      • If you have had a blood clot in the past.
      • If you have high blood pressure, smoke, or if you have been told you have a high level of fat in your blood (hyperlipidemia).
      • About all the medicines you take. Certain other medicines can also increase your risk for blood clots.

Call your healthcare provider or get medical help right away if you get any of the following during treatment with POMALYST:

    • Signs or symptoms of a blood clot in the lung, arm, or leg may include: shortness of breath, chest pain, or arm or leg swelling.

    • Signs or symptoms of a heart attack may include: chest pain that may spread to the arms, neck, jaw, back, or stomach area (abdomen); feeling sweaty, shortness of breath, feeling sick, or vomiting.

    • Signs or symptoms of stroke may include: sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body, severe headache or confusion, or problems with vision, speech, or balance.

    • A red, itchy skin rash
    • Peeling of your skin or blisters
    • Severe itching
    • Fever

 

Get emergency medical help right away if you develop any of the following signs or symptoms during treatment with POMALYST:

  • swelling of your lips, mouth, tongue, or throat
  • trouble breathing or swallowing
  • raised red areas on your skin (hives)
  • a very fast heartbeat
  • You feel dizzy or faint
Who should not take POMALYST?

Do not take POMALYST if you:

  • Are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or become pregnant during treatment with POMALYST. See “What is the most important information I should know about POMALYST?”
  • Are allergic to pomalidomide or any of the ingredients in POMALYST.
What should I tell my healthcare provider (HCP) before taking POMALYST?
  • If you smoke cigarettes (POMALYST may not work as well in people who smoke), have any other medical conditions, or are breastfeeding. Do not breastfeed during treatment with POMALYST—it is not known if POMALYST passes into breast milk and can harm the baby.
  • If you have liver problems
  • If you have kidney problems and are receiving hemodialysis treatment
  • Tell your HCP about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. POMALYST and other medicines may affect each other, causing serious side effects. Talk with your HCP before taking any new medicines.
How should I take POMALYST?

Take POMALYST exactly as prescribed and follow all the instructions of the POMALYST REMS program.

  • Swallow POMALYST capsules whole with water 1 time a day. Do not break, chew, or open capsules.
  • Take POMALYST at the same time each day with or without food.
  • If you are on hemodialysis, take POMALYST after hemodialysis on hemodialysis days.
  • Do not open POMALYST capsules or handle them any more than needed. If you touch a broken POMALYST capsule or the medicine in the capsule, wash the area of your body right away with soap and water.
  • If you miss a dose of POMALYST and it has been less than 12 hours since your regular time, take POMALYST as soon as you remember. If it has been more than 12 hours, just skip your missed dose. Do not take 2 doses at the same time.
  • If you take too much POMALYST, call your healthcare provider (HCP) right away.
  • Do not share POMALYST with other people. It may cause birth defects and other serious problems.
What are the possible side effects of POMALYST?
  • See “What is the most important information I should know about POMALYST?”
  • POMALYST can cause serious side effects, including:
    • Low white blood cells (neutropenia), low platelets (thrombocytopenia), and low red blood cells (anemia) are common with POMALYST, but can also be serious. You may need a blood transfusion or certain medicines if your blood counts drop too low. Your blood counts should be checked by your healthcare provider (HCP) weekly for the first 8 weeks of treatment and monthly after that.
    • Severe liver problems, including liver failure and death. Your HCP should do blood tests to check your liver function during your treatment with POMALYST. Tell your HCP right away if you develop any of the following symptoms: yellowing of your skin or the white parts of your eyes (jaundice); dark or brown (tea-colored) urine; pain on the upper right side of your stomach area (abdomen); bleeding or bruising more easily than normal, or feeling very tired.
    • Severe allergic and severe skin reactions can happen with POMALYST and may cause death.
    • Dizziness and confusion. Avoid taking other medicines that may cause dizziness and confusion during treatment with POMALYST. Avoid situations that require you to be alert until you know how POMALYST affects you.
    • Nerve damage. Stop taking POMALYST and call your HCP if you develop numbness, tingling, pain, or a burning sensation in your hands, legs, or feet.
    • New cancers (malignancies). New cancers, including certain blood cancers (acute myelogenous leukemia or AML) have been seen in people who received POMALYST. Talk with your HCP about your risk.
    • Tumor Lysis Syndrome (TLS). TLS is caused by the fast breakdown of cancer cells. TLS can cause kidney failure and the need for dialysis treatment, abnormal heart rhythm, seizure, and sometimes death. Your HCP may do blood tests to check you for TLS.
  • The most common side effects of POMALYST include tiredness, weakness, constipation, nausea, diarrhea, shortness of breath, upper respiratory tract infection, back pain, and fever.
  • These are not all the possible side effects of POMALYST. Your HCP may tell you to stop taking POMALYST if you develop certain serious side effects during treatment. Call your HCP for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Boxed WARNINGS and Medication Guide.